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Acute Loss of Smell or Taste Without Nasal Blockage Should Raise Suspicion for COVID-19 Infection

Acute Loss of Smell or Taste Without Nasal Blockage Should Raise Suspicion for COVID-19 Infection



Acute Loss of Smell or Taste Without Nasal Blockage Should Raise Suspicion for COVID-19 Infection




Journal of Evidence-Based Dental Practice, 2021-03-01, Volume 21, Issue 1, Article 101525, Copyright © 2020 Elsevier Inc.


Article Title and Bibliographic Information

Taste and smell as chemosensory dysfunctions in COVID-19 infection. Passarelli PC, Lopez MA, Mastandrea Bonaviri GN, Garcia-Godoy F, D'Addona A. Am J Dent 2020;33(3):135-137.

Source of Funding

Information not available.

Type of Study/Design

Systematic review.

SORT SCORE
A B C D
SORT, Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE
1 2 3
See page ▪▪▪ for complete details regarding SORT and LEVEL OF EVIDENCE grading system.


Summary


Subjects or Study Selection

This systematic review included studies that assessed the number or percentage of patients with COVID-19 presenting with loss of smell (anosmia) and/or loss of taste (ageusia). Only human studies published in English were included and authors excluded letters, review articles, and unpublished abstracts.


Key Study Factor

The systematic review included cross-sectional studies that reported the prevalence of anosmia and/or ageusia in patients with COVID-19.


Main Outcome Measure

The main outcome measure was the number or percentage of patients with COVID-19 presenting with anosmia and/or ageusia.


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