End










Chapter
13
End
Jordi
Manauta
Anna
Salat
Interview
with
Luis
Jane

@'!
tOLUd
a tYufuf#.
dzL
of'"
CO,,tafJe,
O/l
mk
dop
fJfo/l{f
·
••

'130
Dr Luis Jane has spent the last
25
years of his life
trying
to
understand how to reproduce the beauty of a smile. Biology and
integration
have
been the main philosophies of
minimally
invasive
dental rehabilitation, which has guided him
all this
time
in both
his private practice and his teaching roles,
first
at the University of
Barcelona and recently at the
International University of Catalonia
as
director
of the Operative and Esthetic Dentistry Department.
Lecturer at numerous courses within and outside the university
in Spain, Europe, and South America, Dr
Jane has published
numerous articles and book chapters about cosmetic
dentistry
.
He
is
a
member
of numerous national and international academies,
including the European Academy of Esthetic Dentistry and the
Spanish Society of Prosthodontics.
I
.J

Q:
Do
you believe that stratification techniques are
advanced procedures meant
only for specialists or do
you think they must
be
taught to every dentist?
A:
To
claim
that
stratification techniques should
be
used exclusively
by
specialists is to ignore anatomy,
biomechanics, and cosmetic dentistry.
To
ignore
stratification techniques in undergraduate training and
continuing education for general practitioners
is
to
promote monochromatic teeth with poor biomechanical
properties.
It means overlooking the shrinkage and
curing stress
problems in resins. Stratification
is
much
more than highlighting
an
incisal edge or building some
mamelons.
To
disregard these principles is the same
as
ignoring all the beauty
that
nature
gave
us along with
the mandate of preserving and reproducing it.
Ultimately,
limiting
knowledge of stratification tech-
niques to specialists
is
like restricting the knowledge
of human anatomy to surgeons. Paraphrasing
Michel-
angelo,
we
can say
that
inside any composite case
resides the beauty of a tooth;
we
just need to know how
to stratify
it.
431

You're Reading a Preview

Become a DentistryKey membership for Full access and enjoy Unlimited articles

Become membership

If you are a member. Log in here

Was this article helpful?

Chapter 13 End Jordi Manauta • Anna Salat Interview with Luis Jane @'! tOLUd a tYufuf#. dzL of'" CO,,tafJe, O/l mk dop fJfo/l{f · •• '130 Dr Luis Jane has spent the last 25 years of his life trying to understand how to reproduce the beauty of a smile. Biology and integration have been the main philosophies of minimally invasive dental rehabilitation, which has guided him all this time in both his private practice and his teaching roles, first at the University of Barcelona and recently at the International University of Catalonia as director of the Operative and Esthetic Dentistry Department. Lecturer at numerous courses within and outside the university in Spain, Europe, and South America, Dr Jane has published numerous articles and book chapters about cosmetic dentistry. He is a member of numerous national and international academies, including the European Academy of Esthetic Dentistry and the Spanish Society of Prosthodontics. I .J Q: Do you believe that stratification techniques are advanced procedures meant only for specialists or do you think they must be taught to every dentist? A: To claim that stratification techniques should be used exclusively by specialists is to ignore anatomy, biomechanics, and cosmetic dentistry. To ignore stratification techniques in undergraduate training and continuing education for general practitioners is to promote monochromatic teeth with poor biomechanical properties. It means overlooking the shrinkage and curing stress problems in resins. Stratification is much more than highlighting an incisal edge or building some mamelons. To disregard these principles is the same as ignoring all the beauty that nature gave us along with the mandate of preserving and reproducing it. Ultimately, limiting knowledge of stratification tech-niques to specialists is like restricting the knowledge of human anatomy to surgeons. Paraphrasing Michel-angelo, we can say that inside any composite case resides the beauty of a tooth; we just need to know how to stratify it. 431 No dental professional we have known has an instinctive talent for dental color comprehension. It is true that some of them have sharper skills, but the height of excellence is gained after some practice. Professionals linked to any color discipline, such as painters, plastic producers, photographers, and dress designers, among others, are incredibly talented when trying to understand dental color. Laypersons (not linked with a· color discipline) have amazed us when we have asked them to organize a shade guide with its numeric data hidden, demonstrating outstanding faculties with no previous knowledge of dental color. This fact means that if no physical impediment is present, anyone is capable of understanding this discipline. An employee from the bakery where I am a frequent client in my hometown did an outstanding job of arranging this same shade guide with an 873 accurate match. At the present, image technologies are growing and developing at a fierce speed. Someday, technology will be an excellent aid for our work, but in the meantime it is imperative to understand basic color theory for a correct use of this machinery and to keep learning about it for future development. This being said, it is time to take some action and become regular readers about color, art, painting, photography, or any subject concerning image, light, or color. We must handle composite resins with no fear of the complex codes appearing in the syringes, classify them, analyze them visually far from the patient's mouth, discover their properties and play with them, and build our own shade guides. In this book we have described four different ways to do that, and none of them requires expensive technology or special skills. We can say that any discipline requires training, and any professional trainer would surely suggest a soft but regular start. Here are some suggestions ... Color Abandon the idea that color is complex. Learn some of the basic concepts and start exploring the composite resin systems right away. Remove the dust from your camera and start taking big, clean framed pictures. Analyze your shade guide and build your own after reading this book. In . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ' . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ' . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ' . . . . Dentin comp.osite resin is the key to achieving a perfect restoration. It should be chromatic (yellow-orange) and fluorescent, but most of all it needs to have the right opacity. Spend all your time and effort discovering which dentin composite is the right one. Learn how to layer it perfectly. Four layering techniques have been described in detail and another six were mentioned. Out Enamel composite resin provides the beauty of a restoration, and the secret is to learn the right amount of enamel to be placed. Too much will result in a gray tooth, and too little will result in an opaque, fake ·looking tooth. Play with the thicknesses of enamel and dentin to discover the endless esthetic possibilities of any composite material. Mid Everything placed between the dentin and the enamel will give the tooth its personality and uniqueness. The features of natural teeth and the classification of natural phenomena are the most important concepts to learn , because the placement of these masses is not technically complicated. Classification The most difficult cases for color matching are the ones that you do not understand. Learn to place these concepts in order, and they will help you to analyze and understand every feature of any tooth. This information will be useful not only for reproducing the tooth but for communicatin g and keep record of the slightest details. Pa latal Features In recent years palatal restorations have gained considerable importance for rehabilitation of eroded and abraded dentures. Accurate repro· duction of shape, anatomy, and function in this area will provide function. Color, which may not appear too important, will provide excellence and a sense of thickness that will be very help-ful in the present treatment and in future years . Posterior Teeth Stratification is not optional in posterior resto-rations; it is mandatory, even when the single-shade technique is used. Layering is the most powerful weapon in the battle against contrac-tion and stress. Start stratifying one shade in many layers, and soon you will be able to add more and more colors to your restorations. Stratifying in posterior restorations means peace of mind. Physiologic Phenomena Understanding . how teeth behave over time will permit you to predict the future of natural teeth and the way they behave with or without restorations. Learning to stratify these features not only provides knowledge but also represents a step toward integrating difficult restorations in special cases. Pathologic Phenomena Reproduce them for fun or for artistic reasons, but at least try, as a challenge, to do these exercises, to understand color complexity, to gain skills, and lose fear of complex stratifications. Once you see that pathologic phenomena are not as complex as you had imagined, color analysis of healthy teeth will become an easy and pleasant task. Surface and Polishing Because a perfect stratification is only half of the work, the surface must be as perfect as possible. A beautiful restoration simply does not exist without perfect polishing. Take a low-speed fine diamond bur and start exploring tooth geography. Then, with the other materials suggested in this book, make any composite shine. This is the only way to ensure long-lasting restorations. Red Esth etics Stratification techniques for pink esthetics are simi-lar to those for teeth. It is necessary to know the materials, choose the right opacities, and learn how to mix the stains. Any strange gingiva l color is just two stains away from being discovered . Analysis A very simple analysis of any composite system will help you to understand which materials you are using, where to apply them, and what to expect from them. Your trial of a brand new material should never be carried out in a patient's mouth. In daily practice, composite resins are the materials most commonly used for restorative dentistry. They are used for preventive seals, minimally invasive restorations, buildups, and complex direct and indirect restorations in anterior and posterior teeth. Indeed , it is in the anterior sections where composite resins have traditionally been used to greatest effect, enabling clinicians to carry out complex, direct restorations with notable esthetic and clinical results, especially when the techniques shown in this book are learned. Recent product developments combined with clinical research on stratification have made it possible to utilize new composites that have excellent characteristics of opalescence and fluorescence and provide an excellent color range to choose from. It is, however, a common complaint among clinicians that the layering techniques are rather complex and that it is difficult to make the right color choice. Paradoxically, they say that the appearance on the market of sophisticated materials, designed to give even better results in the medium and long term, only makes it more difficult to make the correct decision. Indeed, many of these colleagues, after the first buzz of enthusiasm, give up on the layering techniques and opt for materials that they claim are "simpler," "chameleon· like,'' or "mimetic." However, predictability of results is more important than simplicity, because it is the factor that provides advantages in terms of both work quality and economy for clinicians and patients. To conquer esthetic dentistry (beauty, function, and predictability) professionals should be analytical and precise and adhere to protocol. Every dentist should practice esthetic dentistry, because there are no patients asking for unesthetic treatments. All of these techniques are constantly undergoing updates and development. Follow us at: www.styleitaliano.org facebook .com/ style ital iano @styleita liano Artwork Page 4 Page 16 Page 22 Page 26 Page 75 Page 80 Page 146 Page 184 Page 213 Page 238 Page 260 Page 278 Page 283 Page 312 Page 330 Page 350 Page 386 Page 408 Page 428 oYers An Atlas of Composite Resin Stratification La pasta by Anna Salat and Manuel Ruiz Alfaro Ciao by Jordi Manauta Nature Layers by Jordi Manauta Color Machinery by Manuel Ruiz Alfaro Wash Away the Blues by Nancy Eckels Vulcano Grass by Manuel Ruiz Alfaro Fashion Illusion by Manuel Ruiz Alfaro Psycheqelic Rabbit by Manuel Ruiz Alfaro Costa Brava by Anna Salat and Jordi Manauta Nature Calling by Manuel Ruiz Alfaro True Path by Manuel Ruiz Alfaro Monster Attack by Manuel Ruiz Alfaro Happy Moment by Manuel Ruiz Alfaro Only Time Knows by Manuel Ruiz Alfaro What's on Your Mind? by Manuel Ruiz Alfaro C6smico by Manuel Ruiz Alfaro Building a New Earth by Manuel Ruiz Alfaro Portrait Number 1 by Manuel Ruiz Alfaro Golden Years by Manuel Ruiz Alfaro and Walter Devoto

Related Articles

Leave A Comment?