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Response to the letter to the editor regarding “Concerns regarding the published article ‘Effect of dopaminergic agonist group of drugs in treatment of sleep bruxism: A systematic review’ by Bhattacharjee et al. J Prosthet Dent. 2021 Jan 14:S0022-3913(20)30752-6”

Response to the letter to the editor regarding “Concerns regarding the published article ‘Effect of dopaminergic agonist group of drugs in treatment of sleep bruxism: A systematic review’ by Bhattacharjee et al. J Prosthet Dent. 2021 Jan 14:S0022-3913(20)30752-6”

Response to the letter to the editor regarding “Concerns regarding the published article ‘Effect of dopaminergic agonist group of drugs in treatment of sleep bruxism: A systematic review’ by Bhattacharjee et al. J Prosthet Dent. 2021 Jan 14:S0022-3913(20)30752-6”

Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry, 2021-07-01, Volume 126, Issue 1, Pages 135-136, Copyright © 2021 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry

We thank Drs Lobbezoo, Verhoeff, and Aarab for their comments regarding the article “Effect of dopaminergic agonist group of drugs in treatment of sleep bruxism: A systematic review” and appreciate the opportunity to respond. As Drs Lobbezoo, Verhoeff, and Aarab note, it is true that most of the definition of Guidelines of Orofacial Pain has been taken from the study Lobbezoo et al with appropriate credit. There was no intention to lessen the importance of the article of Lobbezoo et al, as Guidelines for Orofacial Pain is followed worldwide, and we have cited their definition for the benefit of the readers.

Regarding the second concern on lack of precision in citation of references regarding the statement “Previously, occlusal interferences and malocclusion were believed to be major factors responsible for sleep bruxism,” we feel there may have been a misinterpretation regarding this statement. Our intention to cite 4 articles was to support our statement “Previously, occlusal interferences and malocclusion were believed to be major factors responsible for sleep bruxism” and to point out that even the respective authors of these cited articles mentioned this previous belief and debunked the association between dentofacial factors and bruxism. In the article by Lobbezoo et al, it was stated that “They carefully concluded that there might be a possible involvement of occlusal disharmonies in the putative role of central catecholaminergic neurotransmission in the etiology of parafunctional masticatory movements.” Previous studies used to believe occlusal discrepancies as a causative factor.

Regarding the statement on risk of bias score, we stated “Two of the 4 included studies did not describe allocation concealment and an adequate sequence generation procedure during randomization” and the information on randomization was not mentioned in the articles. , As per the guidelines of Cochrane risk of bias tool for randomized controlled clinical trials, overall risk of bias should be considered as high if 2 or more criteria listed as high or unclear risk of bias and that could influence the result. Similarly, there was also no intention to reduce the importance of these 2 highly significant and relevant articles on this topic through our result. We apologize regarding our inability to contact the authors prior to writing this article. We hope that our comments may help to clarify the concerns regarding our article.

See Also

Again we are very much thankful to Drs Lobbezoo, Verhoeff, and Aarab for their queries and concerns and future suggestions regarding the article. There was no such intention to do injustice to the previous publications on this topic.

References

  • 1. De Leeuw R., Klasser G.D.: Orofacial pain. Guidelines for assessment, diagnosis, and management.6th ed.2008.Quintessence Publishing Co, Inc.Chicago, ILpp. 229.
  • 2. Lobbezoo F., Ahlberg J., Glaros A.G., Kato T., Koyano K., Lavigne G.J., et. al.: Bruxism defined and graded: An international consensus. J Oral Rehabil 2013; 40: pp. 2-4.
  • 3. Macedo C.R., Machado M.A., Silva A.B., Prado G.F.: Pharmacotherapy for sleep bruxism. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2007; 4: pp. CD005514.
  • 4. Thorpy M.J.: Classification of sleep disorders. Neurotherapeutics 2012; 9: pp. 687-701.
  • 5. Clark G.T., Adler R.C.: A critical evaluation of occlusal therapy. Occlusal adjustment procedures. J Am Dent Assoc 1985; 110: pp. 743-750.
  • 6. Lobbezoo F., Rompré P.H., Soucy J.P., Iafrancesco C., Turkewicz J., Montplaisir J.Y., et. al.: Lack of associations between occlusal and cephalometric measures, side imbalance in striatal D2 receptor binding, and sleep-related oromotor activities. J Orofac Pain 2001; 15: pp. 64-71.
  • 7. Lobbezoo F., Lavigne G.J., Tanguay R., Montplaisir J.Y.: The effect of the catecholamine precursor L-dopa on sleep bruxism: A controlled clinical trial. Movement Disorders 1997; 12: pp. 73-78.
  • 8. Lobbezoo F., Soucy J.P., Hartman N.G., Montplaisir J.Y., Lavigne G.J.: Effects of the dopamine D2 receptor agonist bromocriptine on sleep bruxism: Report of two single-patient clinical trials. J Dent Res 1997; 76: pp. 1611-1615.
  • 9. Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool – NCBI. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK132494/bin/appf-fm1.pdf